Mix 106.3
Canberra's Greatest Hits

Now Playing:

Loading...
Listen on

Bali Airport Closures Cause Chaos Again

Bali's airport will be closed until Thursday morning because of the worsening volcanic ash situation.

Airport managers Angkasa Pura announced the closure on Twitter on Wednesday morning, adding they would evaluate conditions again later in the day.

The airport was expected to be closed until 0845 local time on Thursday.

Mt Rinjani erupted again around 0245 local time on Wednesday, authorities said.

Indonesia's National Disaster Mitigation Agency's Sutopo Purwo Nugroho said ash spread northwest and southwest from the centre of the eruption with a speed of 10 knots.

"The eruption reached a height of 3800 metres above sea level or 1500 metres from the top of Barujari volcano," he said.

"The height of Barujari volcano itself is 2300 metres above sea level.

"The ash is heading to the west with the wind."

A satellite image showed the spread of ash over Lombok, where the volcano is located, blowing to the west over Bali and reaching as far as Java's east.

Thousands of Australians are set to be stuck on Bali for a third straight day, with Virgin Australia scrapping more flights to and from the holiday destination.

Virgin has canned seven Australian flights destined for Bali on Thursday, and are yet to decide the fate of six more services.

All AirAsia flights to and from Bali have also been cancelled.

Jetstar has pulled all flights to and from Bali on Wednesday, and is expected decide on Thursday's services on Wednesday evening.

The ash cloud has also forced the closure of Lombok airport.

Ash from the Barujari Crater on Mt Rinjani, on the island of Lombok east of Bali, has been blowing toward the Denpasar airport for about a week since the volcano started emitting debris on October 25 after an eruption.

It's the second time in recent months that volcanic eruptions in Indonesia have caused travel chaos for Australians holidaying in Bali.

A corrosive silica-based ash cloud thrown up by Mt Raung in the same area in July caused concerns until it began to ebb in August.

AAP

Share this: